Today’s news:

Interested party eyes fire-ravaged WP Rd. site

A building destroyed by a fire last November near Pelham Parkway has been recently cleaned up, leaving room for the new building project local shoppers have been clamoring for. 

And local residents and shoppers may have their wish, as a new retailer may be closing in on a deal to build at the corner of Lydig and White Plains Road. 

A representative of Sopher Properties, who is marketing the lot, confirmed on June 30 that negotiations were ongoing with a party looking to occupy the commercial site.  He said details might be finalized in the coming weeks. 

Larry Prospect, of the White Plains Road Business Improvement District, commented on the news. 

“It sounds good, but I’d like to find out what store is going to occupy the space first,” he said, noting that he looks forward to seeing the vacant property once again contributing to the White Plains Road economy.

It has been several months since the property has seen any action after a fire ravaged the storefronts on February 4.  Over 200 firefighters fought the inferno that started at the Super Laundromat, 632 Lydig Avenue, leaving a boarded up mess amidst the bustling shopping district.

White Plains Road businesses that were destroyed include Rose Flower Balloons, Adam’s Jewelry, Hua Yung Kitchen, Sprint, Sleepy’s Mattress, GEM Pawnbrokers, Subway and Proland Sneakers.

The Sprint store has moved across the street to the Sterling Optical location, while Lydig Avenue stores such as Tono Barbers is now located at 768 Lydig Avenue and Julia Unisex is now at 2128 White Plains Road.

What new business will soon make its home in the White Plains Road BID is anyone’s guess. 

What is known is that a sign on the property states the developer will build to suit, fueling speculation that the property is being geared toward one large retailer, a possible anchor tenant. 

Speculating on the new tenant, Prospect hoped for a store or stores that will bring more shoppers into the area or fill a local need.  He knows what the area doesn’t need.

“A bank won’t bring anything more to the street [with a number of banks already on the block], whereas a children’s store would do so much for the area,” Prospect said. 

Pin It
Print this story

CNG: Community Newspaper Group