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DOE pursues P.S. 105 space

With an ever-expanding population, the Pelham Parkway South community is seeking an annex to P.S. 105 at the former site of Young Israel of Pelham Parkway.

Though the site, located at 2126 Barnes Avenue, is in the final stages of being sold for use as a MRI and medical facility, DOE is undeterred and is actively pursuing the location.

“We have been working with Councilman Jimmy Vacca and have investigated this site and are very interested in it,” said William Havemann, spokesperson for DOE. “No final agreement has been made but it is something we are currently pursuing”

Currently at 120% capacity, with approximately 1,500 students, P.S. 105’s principal Christopher Eustace, along with and local parents and residents, is concerned with conditions at the school as more children enroll in the school.

“We have been working with Department of Education and the School Construction Authority, as well as Vacca, who has been a tremendous help in trying to secure space, along with John Fratta,” said Eustace. “So everyone has been very helpful. We understand in these economic times finding seats is difficult but we want to work together to look at the long terms problems and come up with a solution.”

Eustace expects to see an influx of approximately 300 students within the next few years.

“At this point we certainly have it under control, but if we do get a lot more students we would have to come up with a long-term plan,” said Eustace. “Right now the safety of students and the value of education is not compromised, however additional space would always be a benefit.”

According to DOE, the Capital Plan for 2010-2014 calls for two school buildings to accommodate roughly 1,476 seats in school district 11 to relieve overcrowding.

“A priority with me has been relief for P.S. 105, one of most overcrowded schools in my district, and we were not going to give up on getting space because we have situation where it seems to be getting worse every year,” said Vacca.

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